A French Recipe for Pork Roast—Perfect for the All-Clad Braiser

In this easy French method for cooking pork roast, pork shoulder gets braised to meltingly tender perfection, with sweet onions, dried, cherries, and a hint of orange. It’s a terrific pork recipe for a braiser.

Pork Roast in the All-Clad Braiser.

Pork Roast in the All-Clad Braiser.

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If you’ve been following along these past few weeks, you’ve likely noticed that this season is all about braising. While recently  testing out the All-Clad Braiser, I developed this French recipe for pork shoulder. I started with a recipe I found in Gordon Hammersley’s book, Bistro Cooking at Home, a beautiful tome that was featured in a braising article I worked on eons ago for the late, great Country Home magazine.

Hammersley’s recipe calls for prunes, Armagnac, sage, and walnuts—favorite flavors of the Southwest of France. For my recipe, I used his basic braising method, but for the flavorings, I went further south, into the Roussillon (famous for its cherries) and then over to Provence, calling on herbes de Provence, that fabulous dried herb blend anchored by thyme, rosemary, and lavender. It’s one of my favorite braiser recipes ever, and it’s easy in a fix-and-forget way—the kind of cooking that Hammersley calls “walk away” cooking. Love that term.

Enjoy the roast with  pureed potatoes, and if you can find any fresh, local, in-season green beans, well, you couldn’t possibly go wrong, could you?

I used the All-Clad Braiser for this roast. Very pleased with the results!

I used the All-Clad Braiser for this roast. Very pleased with the results!

Pot-Roasted Pork with Orange, Dried Cherries, and Herbes de Provence
Serves 6.

If you have time, make this roast a day in advance. Refrigerate the roast in its cooking liquid up to 48 hours. This helps the flavors meld and also makes it incredibly easy to remove the fat, which will have separated and semi-solidified into a spoonable layer on the top.

1            3 1/2 to 4-pound boneless pork shoulder (sometimes labeled “Boston Butt”), trimmed of excess fat
2            tablespoons vegetable oil
2            sweet onions (such as Vidalia or Oso Sweet), cut into thick rounds
1            cup dry white wine
1/2        cup low-sodium chicken broth
2            tablespoons honey
2            tablespoons orange-flavored spirit, such as Grand Marnier or Cointreau
1            tablespoon dried herbes de Provence, crushed
1/8        teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2        cup dried sweet and/or tart cherries

1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Season the pork generously with salt and freshly ground black pepper. In a 3 to 4-quart braiser, heat the vegetable oil over medium heat until it shimmers. Add the pork and brown well on all sides, about 10 minutes.

2. Remove the pork from the pan and add the onions; cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly brown, about 10 minutes. Add the white wine, chicken broth, honey, orange spirit, herbes de Provence, and cayenne pepper. Bring to a boiling, stirring up any brown bits that may be present on the bottom of the pan.

3. Return the roast to the pan; cover and slide into the oven. Cook until the pork is very tender, about 2 hours. Uncover the braiser; add the cherries, sprinkling them around the roast and into the liquid in the pan. Continue to bake, uncovered, for 30 more minutes.

4. Skim fat from cooking liquid. Transfer the roast to a cutting board and using a slotted spoon, transfer the onions and cherries to the top of the roast. Tent the roast with foil. For the sauce, place the braiser over moderately high heat and bring the cooking liquid to a boil; cook until reduced by about half. Slice the roast; moisten it with the some of the sauce. Pass the remaining sauce with the roast to serve.

A few tips/thoughts:

I changed a lot of things from Hammersley's recipe, but one thing I definitely held onto was the idea of cutting the onions quite thick. That way, they won't cook down to nothingless.

I changed the major flavor profile from Hammersley’s recipe, but one thing I definitely held onto was the idea of cutting the onions quite thick. That way, they won’t cook down to nothingness.

 

Sometimes I get impatient with browning meat, and I throw the onions in before the meat is brown. Didn't hurt a thing, and it hurried up the process a bit.

Guilty as charged! Yes, I admit that sometimes I get impatient with browning meat, and I throw the onions in before the meat is brown. Didn’t hurt a thing—with the wide base of the braising pan offered plenty of room.

For contrast, I like using both sweet and tart cherries, though you could use just one or the other.

For contrast, I like using both sweet and tart cherries, though you could use just one or the other.

 

Other links you might enjoy:
What is a Braiser? What is a Dutch Oven? Should I invest?
Review of the All-Clad Braiser
Review of the Lodge Braiser
A list of all recipes in my Braiser Cookbook
 How to Braise without a Braiser

If you like this recipe, check out my cookbook, The Braiser Cookbook: 22 irresistible recipes created just for your braiser-great for Le Creuset, Lodge, All-Clad, Staub, Tromantina, and all other braiser pans.

 


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