Country-Style Pork Ribs in the Instant Pot—A Great French Pork Stew Recipe

Pork-Mushroom-Wine Stew (aka: Blanquette de Porc). Pork Stew Recipe for the Instant Pot. Photo by my good friend Richard Swearinger.

Here’s a pork recipe for the instant pot. This recipe for country-style pork ribs in the Instant Pot is patterned after a French stew known as a blanquette (a white stew). Basically, you cook country-style ribs with wine, chicken stock and vegetables, then add a few finishing touches (including cream—that’s what makes it white) for a stew that’s exactly my kind of French cooking in winter—rich, refined-rustic, and utterly warming for the season.

So, what do I think of the Instant Pot? The jury is still out. I’ve only made two recipes in it. While both turned out beautifully, I can’t say they were any better than what I’d make using a conventional braiser. Yes, both recipes might have taken less cook time, but not enough to make me go out and buy a Instant Pot. Still, I’m going to test this big boy out some more and give you my final report.

But for now, if you’re looking for French recipes for your Instant Pot, give this one a go! PS: It looks harder than it is—the recipe is long, because I have to put all those Instant Pot instructions in! This is not a “dump everything in the pot and walk away” recipe—but those little finishing steps make all the difference! I guarantee you, they’re worth it.

Please do me a favor, however. Read your Instant Pot directions thoroughly—make sure you know how the thing works!

Enjoy!

French Pork Stew (Blanquette of Pork) Instant Pot Recipe.

 

4.0 from 1 reviews
French Pork Stew in the Instant Pot
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4 servings
 
Note: This was tested on the six-quart Duo Plus Instant Pot. Serve this with Any-Night Baked Rice hot parsleyed noodles, or whipped potatoes.
Ingredients
  • 2 pounds country-style pork ribs
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and quartered
  • 1 large carrot, cut in half crosswise, then each half cut into quarters
  • 1 celery rib including leaves, cut into 3-inch pieces
  • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 bouquet garni (see note in step 6, below)
  • 4 carrots, cut into ¼ x 2 inch sticks
  • ½ 16-ounce bag pearl onions
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 6 ounces fresh tiny button mushrooms (or use larger mushrooms, halved or quartered), stems
  • trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Pat pork dry with paper towels. Season pork to taste with salt and pepper. Press "saute" the instant pot and set it on the "more" setting. Heat the oil in the inner pot until it shimmers. With the lid off, brown pork in the oil, turning as needed to brown evenly (you'll likely need to do this in batches). If the temperature is too high, reduce the saute level to "normal." Remove all meat from inner pot; drain fat.
  2. Add the wine to the inner pot and stir to loosen up browned bits stuck to the bottom; cook, uncovered, allowing wine to reduce slightly. Add the onion quarters, carrot, celery, broth, and bouquet garni to the inner pot. Return the meat to the inner pot; distribute evenly. Press "Cancel" to exit saute mode.
  3. Close and lock the lid. Set the valve to "Sealing." Press "Meat-Stew" (on using the Duo Plus Instant Pot). Use the - or + button to set the time to 40 minutes.
  4. When the cooking cycle ends, press "Cancel" to turn the pot off. Allow the appliance to cool and release pressure naturally. This will take about 20 minutes. (The little metal float valve on the lid should sink back into the lid, and the lid will unlock).
  5. During the 20 minutes that the pressure is being released, prepare the vegetables: In a large saucepan, bring the four cut carrots, the frozen pearl onions, and ¼ cup lightly salted water to boiling; cover and simmer over medium heat for 4 minutes or until just tender. Drain and remove vegetables to a colander. In the same saucepan, heat the 1 tablespoon of butter over medium heat. Cook and stir the button mushrooms in the butter for 2 to 3 minutes or until tender and light brown. Return onions and carrots to the saucepan; set aside.
  6. After the pressure has released, remove the lid from the Instant Pot. Drain the pork, reserving the cooking stock. Place pork in a bowl; set aside. Discard other solids, including the bouquet garni. Pour the cooking liquid through a fine-mesh sieve back into the inner pot. You should have about 2 cups. If you have less, add a little more chicken stock. Press "sauté" and adjust heat to "more."
  7. As the liquids start to simmer, work the remaining 2 tablespoons butter and the flour together to form a paste. Drop into cooking stock, half a time, cooking and stirring with a wire whisk after each addition until well integrated. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly; cook and stir 1 minute more; add the cream, stirring with a wire whisk to combine. Reduce the Saute level to "less."
  8. Break the meat into 1- to 2-inch pieces. Add the meat to the sauce in the inner pot; add vegetables and lemon juice. Cook and stir very gently to heat through. Serve with hot parsleyed noodles or baked rice.
  9. * Note: For a bouquet garni, using kitchen string tie together 3 sprigs fresh thyme, 5 sprigs parsley, and one bay leaf (or tuck these into an bouquet garni cheesecloth spice bag). Or use a purchased bouquet garni.

Would you like me to develop more French recipes for the Instant Pot? If so, please pin this recipe, share it, comment in the comments section below, or on my facebook page:

 

Many thanks!

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Instant Pot Pot-au-Feu Recipe + First Impressions on this Super-Popular Pot

French Pot-au-Feu // French Pot Roast for the Instant Pot

A friend let me borrow her Instant Pot while she’s out of town. After reading through the manual (zzzzzz) and checking out a few recipes in the booklet that came with the appliance, I adapted my French Pot au Feu recipe for the Instant Pot. Voilà: Here’s how to make French Pot-au-Feu in the Instant Pot (aka French Instant-Pot au Feu).

Mesdames et Monsieurs: My first Instant Pot Recipe. A great French pot roast in the Instant Pot.

Yes! The roast was a success—tender and boldly flavored, with a cook time of 45 minutes (versus 2 hours in the oven). But am I ready to buy myself one of these things? Not yet.

Here are my first impressions…skip to the recipe below if you just want something good to eat tonight.

1. The Instant Pot Is Not a Braiser. The 6-quart Instant Pot has about 8 1/2 inches of cooking surface. So, a good 3-pound chuck roast isn’t going to fit. (Conversely, my Le Creuset Braiser is 12 inches in diameter. A 3-pound roast fits into this pan quite perfectly.) So, you need to buy a 2 1/2-pound roast, and eyeball it to get one that fits into the Instant Pot.

2. The Pressure Cooking Part Is Fast: This is the part I love. I set the roast on pressure cook for 45 minutes and BAM. It was done. The meat was super soft and tender (but by no means mushy and weird), with beefy-bold flavor. I was so impressed. A big score for the Instant Pot. It wrought the same results as my braiser, but in less time.

Bottom Line: I love the Instant Pot for the super-quick cook time and the tender, flavorful results. I wish it had more browning space and could fit a larger roast. Jury’s still out! I’ll report back soon after I’ve tried more recipes.

If you have a Instant Pot, give my recipe a go. It’s quite delish and easy.

4.5 from 2 reviews
Instant Pot-au-Feu Recipe (French Pot Roast)
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4 to 6 servings
 
First, make sure you've read your Instant Pot operating instructions. Every word of them. Okay? These instructions are for the Six-Quart Instant Pot Duo Plus.
Ingredients
  • 1 (2 to 2½-pound) boneless beef chuck pot roast
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 large or 2 small carrots, diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried herb de Provence, crushed
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons butter, at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • Pureed potatoes, Any-Night Baked Rice, or cooked noodles
Instructions
  1. Pat the meat dry with paper towels. Season the meat with salt and pepper. Place the oil in the inner pot. Select the "saute" feature on a six-quart Instant Pot Plus; set it to "more." When the word "hot" displays, brown beef, uncovered, in the oil, turning as needed to brown evenly on all sides. Remove the roast from the pan.
  2. Reduce the saute heat to "normal." Add the onions and carrots; saute until tender, about 2 to 3 minutes. Add the garlic and herbes de Provence and saute briefly. Return the saute heat to "more" and add the wine (careful--it could spatter), stirring to loosen up browned bits stuck to pan. Boil, uncovered, for 2 to 3 minutes or until slightly reduced. Add the beef broth and balsamic vinegar. Press "cancel" to turn off the saute function.
  3. Return the roast to the inner pan. Close and lock the lid. Set the valve to "Sealing." Press "Meat-Stew" (on the Duo Plus Instant Pot). Use the - or + button to set the time to 45 minutes.
  4. When the cooking cycle ends, press "Cancel." Allow the appliance to cool and release pressure naturally. This will take about 20 minutes. (The little metal float valve on the lid should sink back into the lid, and the lid will unlock).
  5. After the pressure has released, uncover the pot and transfer the roast to a cutting board and cover with foil to keep warm.
  6. For the sauce, strain the cooking liquid through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl; discard all of the solids, including the bay leaf. Skim the fat from the cooking liquid and return the liquid to the inner pot. Press the "saute" function and set it on "more." As the liquids start to simmer, work the 2 tablespoons butter and the flour together to form a paste. Drop into cooking stock, half a time, cooking and stirring with a wire whisk after each addition until well integrated. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly; continue cooking until a sauce-like consistency.
  7. Slice the roast into chunks. Serve with sauce and pureed potatoes, baked rice, cooked noodles, or creamy polenta.

 

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Lobster Tails Meunière—A French Way to Cook Lobster Tails

Lobster Tails Meunière: A French Method of Cooking Lobster Tails

Lobster Tails Meunière: A great French way to cook lobster.

About every two or three weeks, lobster tails go on sale at my local Fresh Market. They’re generally $4.99 for 3.5-ounce tails, which is a pretty good price. I often broil them—as shown in this recent how-to story I wrote for the bhg.com website. Certainly, you can’t go wrong with that!

Filet of Sole Meunière. Surely you’ve tried this, haven’t you? Turns out, the meunière prep works great for lobster, too.

But let me tell you: For about a half-a-minute more of your time, you can have these gorgeous Lobster Tails Meunière. As I mention in my book, fish meunière—fish in the style of the miller’s wife—is a classic French way to make fish. As culinary legend has it, the miller’s wife got plenty of fish from the river or stream that powered her husband’s the mill, and she had plenty of flour to cook with.

For fish meunière, you basically dredge the fish in flour; sauté it in oil in a hot pan. Remove the fish; sprinkle with parsley. Melt some butter in the pan, letting it color slightly; add some garlic and cook about 30 seconds to release its flavor. Pour the butter over the fish; sprinkle some lemon juice over that. Serve. That’s it—one of the world’s best ways with fish.

Turns out, the meunière prep works beautifully for lobster tails. I like to butterfly the lobster tails completely—using kitchen shears to cut the tails in half lengthwise through the top shell, the meat, and the bottom shell. This helps them cook more evenly. I deviate slightly from the classic meunière preparation in that I also deglaze the pan with a little wine, letting the lobster tails simmer in the wine a bit (meat side up) to cook them through.

How to serve these beauties? In France, this would be a sit-down first course. They wouldn’t bulk it up with rice or pasta; they might put a few greens on the plate. But really, the tails would likely star solo.

Me, I can’t resist serving them in that classic American way—with a steak. For “date night at home,” I cook one ribeye for Mr. Sportcoat and me. We each enjoy one lobster tail (that is, two halves), a half of a ribeye, a baked potato, and a salad. Oui, mes amis, for this menu, tout est classique!

Here are a few step-by-steps. If you wish, simply scroll down to the recipe. Enjoy!

1. Cut the lobster tails in half. Using kitchen shears, cut lengthwise through the top shell, the meat, and the bottom shell—all the way through. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cutting lobster tails in half: Easy to do with kitchen shears.

2. Lightly dust those lobster tails with butter. Dredge the meat side only (not the hard shell side!) in flour. Lightly is the operative word here—shake off excess flour.

Dredge the halved lobster tails in flour. Lightly.

3. Melt some butter in a medium skillet—use about 1 1/2 tablespoons for every two lobster tails—over medium-high heat. When the butter is melted and hot, add the lobster tail halves, meat side down. Cook until very lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Immediately turn the tails, shell side down. Pour about 1/3 cup wine around the tails, into the pan. Cook until wine is almost evaporated, and tails are cooked through (they should be opaque throughout).

After you’ve seared the lobster, meat side down, turn over and cook a bit with some wine.

4. Remove the lobster to serving plates (two halves per serving). Sprinkle lobster tails with snipped fresh parsley and/or chives. Wipe out skillet. Working quickly, add 2 tablespoons more butter to the skillet. Cook over medium-high heat until it colors slightly. Off heat, add 1 large minced garlic clove, and let it cook 30 seconds or until its flavor is released. Divide melted butter mixture over lobster tails; sprinkle with lemon juice (about 1 tablespoon total for two servings). Serve immediately.

Lobster Tails Menieère. Serve solo as a sit-down first course. Or, serve with a steak for a classic French take on the classic surf-and-turf combo.

If you try this dish, let me know how you like it!

Lobster Tails Meunière—A French Way to Cook Lobster Tails
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 2 servings
 
This is for two servings. You can easily double or triple it for more servings.
Ingredients
  • 2 lobster tails, thawed if frozen
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 3½ tablespoons butter, divided
  • 2 tablespoons freshly minced parsley and/or chives
  • ⅓ cup dry white wine
  • 1 large minced garlic clove
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Using kitchen shears, cut the lobster tails in half lengthwise, cutting completely through top shell, meat, and bottom shell. Season the lobster meat with salt and pepper.
  2. Place the flour in a shallow bowl. Dredge the meat sides of the lobster tails in the flour lightly (do not coat the shell side); shake off excess flour.
  3. Melt 1½ tablespoons of the butter in a skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Add the lobster tails, meat side down, and cook, shifting around in the pan a bit, until the lobster meat is very lightly brown.
  4. Turn the lobster tails, meat side up; pour the white wine around the lobster tails and let the wine simmer until mostly reduced. Place the lobster tails on 2 serving plates; sprinkle with the parsley and/or chives. Carefully wipe out the skillet.
  5. Working quickly, return the skillet to medium-high heat; add the butter and cook until it foams and browns ever so lightly. Take the pan off the heat; add the garlic and swirl it in the butter until its fragrance is released.
  6. Pour garlic-butter mixture evenly over lobster tails. Sprinkle lemon juice evenly over all. Serve immediately.

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