Lucky Me! A Chance Meeting with Janet Fletcher (+ a Great Recipe for Bucatini All'Amatriciana)

Spaghetti all'Amatriciana. Something you can make in 20 minutes, with items you likely have on hand.

Spaghetti all’Amatriciana. Something you can make in 20 minutes, with items you likely have on hand. Photo by Katherine Martinelli via Flickr.

Recently, I had the great pleasure of meeting Janet Fletcher, a renown cookbook author,  food writer, cooking teacher, and bloggiste at Planet Cheese. Here, I tell you about our dinner together, and share my riff on her recipe for Spaghetti all’Amatriciana, which has a secret weapon that makes it better than any other Spaghetti all’Amatriciana I’ve ever had.

Last month, thousands of cheesemakers, cheese lovers, cheese buyers, and all-out cheese enthusiasts descended on Des Moines for the American Cheese Society’s annual conference. As part of this festival, my friends at Comté USA invited me to a private dinner that celebrated this marvelous French mountain cheese.

One of my favorite cheeses, Comté, was featured at a dinner where I met one of my favorite food writers, Janet Fletcher.

One of my favorite cheeses, Comté, was featured at a dinner where I met one of my favorite food writers, Janet Fletcher.

As the group of invitees were sipping cocktails before being seated, a woman introduced herself to me.

“Hello. I’m Janet Fletcher,” she said.

I couldn’t believe it. This woman’s recipes have been on my table literally hundreds of times. I do not exaggerate. During the winter, I make her Spaghetti All’Amatriciana about once a week—it’s a standby when I don’t have a lot of energy to make something complicated, but still want to eat something great.

I’ve been cooking from Michael Chiarello’s Casual Cooking, which Janet co-authored with Michael Chiarello, since I bought the book on a trip to Napa Valley in 2003.

Check out the notes I’ve made over the years on her recipes–you’ll see how much I love them:

Forget over-tomatoey versions you've had in the past. The Fletcher/Chiarello Chicken Cacciatore is the best. And just six ingredients (not including olive oil and salt).

Forget over-tomatoey versions you’ve had in the past. The Fletcher/Chiarello Chicken Cacciatore Pronto is the best. And just six ingredients (not including olive oil and salt).

 

Here, I rave about the Roast Chicken with Rosemary and Lemon Salt. Yes--something this simple can be this great.

Above, I rave about the Roast Chicken with Rosemary and Lemon Salt. Yes–something this simple can be this great.

 

Notes on the Bolognese recipe. If you, like me, find the most pleasure in cooking something that's loved by someone you love, you'll appreciate this note. (Mr. Sportcoat adores this recipe.)

Notes on the Bolognese recipe. If you, like me, find great pleasure in cooking something that someone you love loves, you’ll appreciate this note. (Mr. Sportcoat adores this recipe.)

I could go on, as there are other notes in this book lauding the recipes. What I love most about them is that none are complicated at all; in most cases, I’m always amazed at how just a handful of ingredients turn out such great results. Anybody can cook these recipes, because Janet tells you exactly what you need to know.

Janet Fletcher (left) and me at the Comté USA dinner. Can you tell how how happy I am to meet her?

Janet Fletcher (left) and me at the Comté USA dinner. Can you tell how how happy I am to meet her?

Back to my dinner with Janet: Of course, I snagged a seat beside her, and I’m so glad I did. Believe me, I’ve been to a lot of dinners put on for the press by wineries, food producers, etc. Many of them are fraught with small chit-chat and false camaraderie that’s rarely very satisfying. This dinner proved a great exception; alongside our tablemates (including Mr. Sportcoat and Comté PR pro Nicole Sizemore), we all fell easily into meaningful conversations about food, food politics, politics, and the world beyond. It was a thrilling evening.

In addition to being an expert cookbook author (check out her books, here), Janet is a blogger that specializes in cheese. If you love cheese as much as I do (and I assume you do, if you follow this French food blog!), then you really should sign up for her Planet Cheese E-Cheeseletter that explores the world of cheese.

Yes! I use La Quercia Pancetta when I have it around. But I'll also use bacon, which I always have around.

Yes! I use La Quercia Pancetta when I have it around. But I’ll also use bacon, which I always have around.

Meanwhile, I post, below, my riff on her Spaghetti all’Amatriciana. I’ve fiddled with this recipe not because the original isn’t perfect, but because I’m more likely to have bacon around my house than pancetta, which the original recipe calls for. I also adjusted just a few other things, but the simple-but-life-enhancing spirit of the dish remains the same.

PS: Why is this Bucatini is better than any other recipe out there? Most don’t call for that little touch of vinegar, and it adds so much—a counterpoint of brightness amidst the richness of the bacon. Trust me.

Try it once, and I bet it will become a staple in your house for those busy weeknights when you don’t have a lot of energy, but want to eat something inspired all the same.

5.0 from 3 reviews
Bucatini All'Amatriciana
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
This recipe was adapted from Michael Chiarello's Casual Cooking, by Michael Chiarello and Janet Fletcher. Their recipe calls for spaghetti, which you can also use.
Ingredients
  • ½ 14.5-ounce can (about 1 cup) canned chopped tomatoes, undrained
  • ½ pound bucatini, cooked according to package directions
  • 4 strips bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley
  • 1½ tablespoons wine vinegar (Janet calls for red wine vinegar, but I've used any wine vinegar I have on hand, such as sherry, white-wine or Champagne)
  • ¼ cup freshly grated cheese (the original recipe calls for Pecorino Romano, but I use any high-quality cheese any I have around, such as Parmagiano-Reggiano, Asiago, Comté...I've even used a good-quality white cheddar, in a pinch!
Instructions
  1. Place the tomatoes in a blender or food processor; puree until nearly smooth. Set aside.
  2. Start cooking the pasta according to package directions; drain, reserving ¼ cup of the pasta cooking water. Set pasta aside and keep warm.
  3. While the pasta cooks, cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until cooked through, but do not allow it to brown or crisp. Transfer the bacon to paper-towel-lined plate and drain off most of the fat from the skillet (a teaspoon or two left in the skillet is OK--but you want more flavor from the olive oil than bacon fat).
  4. Heat the olive oil in the same skillet over medium heat; add the onion and cook, stirring, until tender but not brown, about 7 minutes. Add the red pepper flakes and parsley to the skillet; cook and stir for 30 seconds. Add the wine vinegar; cook and stir until it evaporates. Add the pureed tomatoes and the pasta cooking water, and return the bacon to the skillet. Simmer gently for 2 to 3 minutes to allow flavors to meld.
  5. Toss the pasta with the sauce; divide among 4 dinner plates. Top with grated cheese.

Other posts you might enjoy:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note that anytime you buy something from Amazon.com through one of the links I provide, it will help support this site. Thanks for your consideration.

And don’t forget to sign up for Janet Fletcher’s e-Newsletter, Planet Cheese.

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The Piscine of Rosé--French Wine on Ice

Do the French ever put ice in their wine? You bet they do. And it’s called a “Piscine de Vin”—a lovely name for a most refreshing thing.

A Piscine de Rose. Photo by the wine bloggists at Chalk and Cheese Blog. Used by permission.

Une Piscine de Rosé. Photo by the charming wine bloggists at Chalk and Cheese Blog. Used by permission. Read their post for another take on this great drink.

This year, I saw something in Côte d’Azur cafés that I hadn’t noticed that much in the past:  goblet-sized wine glasses filled with wine (or sparking wine) and ice cubes.

Sure, in the past, I’d seen people request a few ice cubes from a waiter, then plunk a few in their wine on a hot day. But I don’t think I’d ever seen so many waiters show up at tables with pre-iced-up goblets filled with wine. And I’d never seen iced-up wine specifically on menus. Until now:

The "Piscine" of wine is popping up all over the place these days.

A French Apéro menu: The “Piscine” of wine is popping everywhere these days.

This year, it was all over the place. And, as it turns out, they have a name for it:

Not only do I ice up my wine. I'll ice up really good wines. Like this fabulous rosé from Tavel.

Not only do I ice up my wine. I’ll ice up really good wines. Like this fabulous Prieuré de Montézargues rosé from Tavel. About $23.

La Piscine de Rosé
or
La Piscine de Champagne

Literally, this means “A Pool of Rosé” (or Champagne). And isn’t that a lovely image? Just so refreshing. It cools you off just thinking about it.

Curiously, I didn’t see quite as many people drinking a “piscine de blanc” (white wine), and I saw no one drinking a “piscine of rouge” (red). But just because I didn’t see it doesn’t mean it’s not done.

So….on the next hot day, go for it. Take the piscine plunge and slip a few ice cubes into that glass of wine. Or sparkling wine. Honestly–it’s a wonderful thing.

Question: Wait a minute. It’s not like we need permission from the French to plunk ice cubes in our wine, right?

Right. But, well, in a way, it did make me feel better about doing so. You see, I’m of a generation that can remember my elders drinking “Riunite on Ice,” (because, you know, “it’s nice”). And by the time I came of age, it was the last thing I wanted to do. Ice in wine just wasn’t cool. And some people still think it’s not.

This was underscored not long ago when I went to an event here in Amerique profonde. The only white wines served were some big, high-alcohol American whites. I asked the wine-server (a noted sommelier in town) if I could have a few ice cubes in my wine.

He all but broke out in hives and said, “I guess so.”

Not wanting to insult his wines (as in: Look, I can’t drink your big fat dizzying overblown whites; plus you’re got them too warm, so just give me some ice already…), I said something apologetic, like, “Yeah, I know–ice in wine. Not cool.”

The som-dude said, “Well, fine. As long as I don’t have to drink it,” and turned away.

This guy needs to go to France and have few Piscines de Rosé…poured over his head.

Okay. Rant over.

Question: Sure, you ice up an inexpensive Rosé or maybe an everyday Prosecco. But would you actually put ice in a really nice wine or Champagne?

Maybe I’d draw the line at a high-end Savennières or that bottle of Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Rosé I have squirreled away.

But yes, I will put ice in a truly good under-$30 wine. Because frankly, cheap wine on ice tastes even cheaper. A great wine on ice can still taste great. Sure, you might not get those super-subtle notes of, say, horehound candy or whatever, but a fresh, rounded rosé with bright-red fruit notes will still have fresh red-fruit notes and a roundness. It will just be more refreshing. A Champagne with pear and apple notes will still have pear and apple. Yes, the ice might mute the flavor, but on a hot day what you lose in flavor intensity you gain in cool refreshment. On a hot day, I’ve never not enjoyed a really good rosé (or sparkling wine) wine on ice.

Tavel rosés are known for their elegance. Too elegant to put on ice?

Tavel rosés are known for their elegance. Too elegant to put on ice? I don’t think so–but I’d love to know what you think!

Here’s a great French rosé to try (whether or not you ice it up): Prieuré de Montézargues 2015. This rosé hails from France’s Tavel region, a place known for bone-dry roses. However, while it’s definitely a racy and crisp style, there’s luscious red fruits here, too: the essence of strawberries and bright red currants come to mind. Wine & Spirits magazine gave it 92 points, naming it a “Best Rosé” in 2016.

And now, I have a few questions for you, dear readers:

• Have you seen the “Piscine of Rosé” in France before recent years? Or is it just “new to me.” (I really don’t recall ever seeing it on a menu before this year–maybe I’ve just been oblivious.)

• Do you ever ice up your wine?

• If you do ice up your wine, do you ever ice up high-end wines? Or just everyday sips?

Tell me in the comments section, below, or, on my Facebook page.

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The Five Best French Apéritifs + Everything You Need to Know about the French Apéro!

Me. After a late-afternoon swim on my balcony in Collioure, during that magical time of the day called the apéro.

Me. After a late-afternoon swim on my balcony in Collioure, during that magical time of the day called the apéro.

What is an apéritif? Is there a difference between an apéritif and a cocktail? Read on to learn everything you need to know about apéritifs, including the five best French apéritifs.

If you read my blog at all, you know how passionate I am about the apéritif—that ritualistic pre-dinner drink that stimulates the appetite and enhances your mood without making your head spin. More interesting than a glass of wine, but not as overwrought and fuzzying as a full-blown cocktail, the apéritif is just the best way in the world to shrug off the cares of the day and ready your spirit for the joys to come—whether it’s a simple Tuesday night meal at home or a dinner with friends.

No matter what else happens in our day, Dave (aka Mr. Sportcoat) and I generally stop everything at an appointed hour and sit down together for our little drink and a snack. Sometimes, it’s the only drink I have in an evening; the pleasant feeling I get from it, and from stopping and relaxing and reconnecting with Dave, just gives me a bon feeling (as my Québecois friend Richard used to call it) that sustains me through the night. If I’m dining with friends, I’ll usually switch to red wine for dinner.

What, then, do I serve most often as an apéritif? Here are five classic French apéritifs—plus see below for one drink you should never, ever serve as an apéritif.

Now: Five Typical French Apéritifs

A Classic Kir au Vin Blanc (Kir with White Wine).

A Classic Kir au Vin Blanc (Kir with White Wine). Photo credit.

1. The Kir, of Course

Surely—if you’re a fan of France—you know this one, but I must mention it anyway. The Kir (rhymes with beer) is the unofficial national apéritif of France; though it’s from Dijon, it’s served all over the country.

How to Make a Kir:  Simply mix about 1 tablespoon crème de cassis with about 4 ounces of a dry white wine. Traditionally, the wine used is Aligoté, a white wine from Burgundy, but take my word for it: All over France, they’ll make it with just about any good, drinkable dry white wine they have. I personally like using an inexpensive white Bordeaux, but I’ll also use whatever good dry white I have on hand, as long as it’s not a big, heavy, overly oaky Chardonnay.

Here’s what you might not know: Crème de Cassis is not the only pony in the Kir rodeo. The French very often use other fruit- or even nut-flavored liqueurs, such as liqueur de Pêche (peach liqueur), liqueur de mûres (blackberry) liqueur de framboise (raspberry), and—one of my favorites—crème de Chaitagne (chestnut liqueur).

Why limit yourself to Crème de Cassis? The French don't! Many liqueurs can be used to make a great Kir—if you can find them.

Why limit yourself to Crème de Cassis? The French don’t! Many liqueurs can be used to make a great Kir—if you can find them.

The trick is, of course, finding these flavored liqueurs stateside. If you live on the coasts, I bet you can score some. I tend to bring it home from you-know-where. And if you’re lucky, you can mail-order them, if you live in a state that allows this.

Start every dinner off with one of these things, and I’ll guarantee you’ll enjoy everything that comes after it more fully.

Classic Kir Royale with crème de Cassis, though you can use any fruit liqueur, as with a kir. Photo by Richard Swearinger

Classic Kir Royale with crème de Cassis, though you can use any fruit liqueur, as with a kir. Photo by Richard Swearinger

2. An Unbeatable Choice: Champagne

Travel into the Champagne region of France, and the apéritif is very often simply an uplifting glass of Champagne—it’s a great apéritif that never fails to set a fine tone for the night.

What’s better than Champagne? Apéritifs made with Champagne. A Kir made with Champagne is called Kir Royale; you can make it with crème de cassis, of course, but you can also use any of the fruit-flavored liqueurs mentioned above. Those are the simplest.

Of course, many drinks are made with Champagne–including the French 75 (with gin) and the classic Champagne Cocktail (with Cognac). But in my view, once they include a spirit, they’re no longer an apéritif, but a cocktail—and that’s a different kind of pleasure (more on cocktails versus apéritifs, below).

For Champagne cocktails that work best as apéritifs, stick to fruit liqueurs and such.

3. An Uncommon Apéritif Here—But Quite Common in France: Fortified Wines

Fortified wines are made by adding a spirit (such as brandy or Cognac) to the wine early so that the fermentation process stops early on. This halts the fermentation and keeps the wine’s sugars intact. The resulting sip has the luscious density and–yes–sweetness, but also sparks of flavor from whatever grapes are used as well as from oak-barrel aging. 

Martini Bianco (White Vermouth) on the rocks. A wonderfully refreshing apéritif.

Martini Bianco (a brand of white vermouth) on the rocks. A wonderfully refreshing apéritif.

Though we often think of fortified wines, such as Port, Madiera, and Marsala, as after-dinner drinks, the French serve them equally often—chilled and in small portions—as apéritifs. You see, something viscous and lightly sweet (but with intrigue) stimulates the appetite better than, say, a light, citrusy Sauvignon Blanc or other super-dry wine. The French have figured this out. Why haven’t we?

A few terrific fortified wines that the French serve as apéritifs include:

• Port (red or ruby–generally not tawny). Serve chilled.
• Vermouth: Fortified wines with aromatic herbs and spices. You’ll generally drink sweet vermouth for your apéritif, the most famous of which is the Martini brand, which comes in white, red, or rose. These are fabulous apéritifs. Serve these chilled, with a couple of ice cubes.
• Madiera: Either dry or sweet can be served as an apéritif. Serve chilled.
• Marsala: Again, either dry or sweet can be served as an apéritif. Serve chilled.
Pineau des Charentes: Harder to find stateside, but definitely worth seeking out, this fortified wine is made in the Cognac region. It’s a golden sip with the luscious density of port, but with bright, honeyed orchard-fruit flavors like golden apples, pears and apricots. My favorite of all the French fortified-wine apéritifs. Serve chilled, in 3- to 4-ounce portions.

Dave, drinking Un Perroquet (Pernod with mint syrup). Honestly, I swear we don't match our outfits to the drinks. Really!

Dave, drinking Un Perroquet (Pernod with mint syrup). Honestly, I swear we don’t match our outfits to the drinks. Really!

4. The South-of-France Go-To: Pernod, Pastis, Ricard, etc.

These anis-flavored apéritifs, classic in Provence, are not for everyone (Mr. Sportcoat enjoys them; I’ll have about one per trip to Mediterranean, just to ease into a sense of place). To serve Pastis, you pour one part over ice, then add water (about 4 parts). Generally, the water is served separately, so that the guest can add water to taste.

The real fun, however, begins when you start adding a flavor to the Pastis. The colors of the drink become amazing, and its anis-flavor a little less one-dimensional. Two favorites:

La Tomate: This drink is named for its color (in this case, a pretty pink). To make pour one part Pernod into a glass; add 1 dash grenadine syrup and add a few ice cubes. Fill glass with four parts cold water. The results taste like a very adult version of Good-and-Plenty candy.

Le Perroquet: Again, this drink is named for its color (again, an amazing green). To make, pour one part Pernod into a glass; add 1 dash crème de menthe syrup and a few ice cubes. Fill glass with four parts cold water. The mix of cool mint and smooth anis makes an amazingly refreshing drink.

CampariRocks

Campari on the rocks.

5. Those Amazing Amari — Apérol and Campari

Although they hail from Italy, not France, the French love these bitter (amari, in Italian, amer, in French) spirits, especially during the apéritif hour. And if you just will not get on the lightly-sweet-apéritif train with me, then drinks made with apérol and Campari are for you.

These refreshingly bitter, ruby-red apéritifs are flavored by top-secret blends of herbs, spices and fruit peels (bitter orange peels and wild herbs come mostly to mind when I sip). Campari is more bitter (and higher in alcohol content–23%) than Apérol (11%), but both are incredibly refreshing.

Best ways to enjoy Campari and Aperol:

• Campari (or Apérol) and Soda: One part of the spirit to two parts soda, on the rocks.
• Campari (or Apérol) on the Rocks: Just pour about 2 ounces on the rocks. Simple and refreshing.
• Apérol Spritz: Consider this a Kir Royale for those who don’t want anything sweet in their sip. Place ice in a big-globe wineglass; add 2 ounces Prosecco, 1 1/4 ounces Aperol, and a splash of Soda water.
• Américano: 1 part Compari and 1 part Red Vermouth plus a splash of soda. A beautifully complex drink that takes the edge off the bitterness of the Campari–but it’s still not sweet!
• Negroni: It’s an Americano with 1 part gin added, and no soda. But to me, with all that booze, this veers into the cocktail camp—it’s not my idea of an apéritif.

More Things You Need to Know: The Apéro

Sweatshirt that says, roughly, "Sorry! Can't do it! It's apéro time!"

Sweatshirt that says, roughly, “Can’t do it! It’s apéro time!”

What is an apéro? Is apéro just a hipster way of saying apéritif?

Not exactly. When people talk about an apéritif, they’re generally talking about the little drink itself (though keep in mind that the drink is rarely served without a little nibble alongside).

When people talk about the apéro, however, it refers to the entire ritual of the drink and the little bite to eat with it—as well as the time you take to relax and enjoy it all with friends.

Question: Can I serve red wine as an Apéritif.

Non! Most red wines are meant to drink with a substantial meal; they’re not apéritifs. They’re not refreshing on their own and they don’t arouse the appetite.

However, if someone you’re hosting specifically requests a glass of red to start off the evening, then, because you’re an excellent host, you will gladly and graciously pour a glass. Because, of course, you are not the kind of know-it-all who would embarrass a guest by mentioning that red wines aren’t meant to drink as an apéritif.

Question: Can Cocktails Be Served as an Apéritif? What’s the Difference Between a Cocktail and an Apéritif?

Sigh. Yes, you an serve a cocktail as an apéritif, if you must. But once you get high-proof spirits in the mix, they’re a different experience than a classic French apéritif, which is generally not a high-proof drink. Apéritifs give you a lift; cocktails give you a buzz.

But I must admit that sometimes cocktails are served as apéritif; one of the most common cocktails served as an apéritif is, of all things, a gin and tonic. I’ve also seen very small glasses of whisky on ice served as apéritifs, but I personally haven’t seen that many French people imbibing one. (UPDATE: In comments section, below, a reader tells me that single-malt Scotches are incredibly popular apéritifs right now!).

Gin + Tonic is an apéritif, as are whiskies. But they're not as common as others I've mentioned above.

Typical apéritif menu in a restaurant: Note that Gin + Tonics are considered apéritifs, as are whiskies (but they’re served in small portions, let me tell you). Oh–and please note that the “Martini” on this menu refers to Martini & Rossi Vermouth (not the cocktail!).

Can Wine Be Served as an Apéritif?

Yes. Rosé and white wines are sometimes served as apéritifs, especially at very casual gatherings. I’ve been served both in French homes; however, it’s been more common, in my experience, to be served one of the apéritifs I’ve mentioned above.

Question: What Do I Serve with an Apéritif?

Good question, because remember: The apéritif is rarely ever served without a nibble.  That bite doesn’t have to be elaborate (some nuts or olives or well-chosen chips will do, if you’re not entertaining). But when a friend stops by, I try to make it nice by putting a few things out. Not too many and not too much. It’s not about grazing until you’re full and no longer want dinner. Because dinner is its own separate pleasure.

The type of thing I'll serve if having a pal stop by.

The type of thing I’ll serve if having a friend stop by. Mozzarella pearls with basil and olive oil, almonds, olives, crackers with a spread I have tucked in the fridge, and some chips.

Remember: The apéro is not meant to be dinner. That would be an apéritif dînatoire (roughly, a heavy cocktail/hors d’ouevres buffet), another topic for another time.

So tell me: What’s your favorite French apéritif? Did I miss one of your regulars? And, if you have any further questions on this favorite topic of mine, don’t hesitate to ask, either in the comments section below, or on my Facebook page.

 

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