Six Easy French Salad Recipes for Late Summer

French Corn and Radish Salad Recipe

French Corn and Radish Salad Recipe

Recipes for easy French Summer Salads! Head to the farmers market, come home, and make one of these great fresh French salads recipes. I’ve provided either the recipe itself or links with each so you can make them today. 

1. French Corn and Radish Salad Recipe

The French don’t eat sweet corn-on-the-cob with the love and gusto that we do, but they do enjoy sweet corn now and then. Here it is in a French Corn and Radish Salad–perfect for the season.

Serves 4.

3 fresh ears corn
1 garlic clove
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1/2 teaspoon mustard
3 dashes hot red pepper sauce
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 cups torn fresh baby lettuces, including some spicy greens such as frisée and arugula
3/4 cup sliced radishes, preferably mild-flavored radishes
1 sweet red pepper, diced
1/4 cup chopped pitted imported black olives, such as Niçoise or Kalamata
1/4 cup snipped fines herbes, or 1/4 cup snipped parsley and chives and 1 teaspoon crushed dried tarragon.

1. Place corn in a large pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil; cover. Turn off the burner and let corn cook in the hot water for 10 minutes. Prepare a large bowl of ice water for cooling cooked corn.

2. While corn is cooking, make the vinaigrette: In a small bowl mash the garlic clove and the salt and pepper to taste with the back of a spoon. Whisk in the vinegar and stir until salt is dissolved. Whisk in the mustard and pepper sauce, then whisk in the olive oil until incorporated. Set vinaigrette aside.

3. Plunge cooked corn into the ice water, allowing it to stand for 2 to 3 minutes or until kernels are cool. Remove ears from water, pat them dry, and scrape kernels off the cobs using a sharp knife.

4. In a medium bowl, toss the lettuces, radishes, sweet pepper, olives, herbs, and corn. Drizzle with the vinaigrette and toss again to serve.

Shave prep time off this easy French salad recipe by purchasing pre-cooked beets in the produce aisle of the supermarket. Photo by Richard Swearinger.

Shave prep time off this easy French salad recipe by purchasing pre-cooked beets in the produce aisle of the supermarket. Photo by Richard Swearinger.

2. French Roasted Beet Salad Recipe

Makes 4 servings.

Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds beets (4 to 5 medium)
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
1 clove garlic, minced
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons walnut or olive oil
1 cup arugula, baby greens or small, tender lettuces
1/2 cup thin slices purple onion (optional)
1/2 cup blue cheese, crumbled
Snipped fresh chives (optional)

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Trim stems and roots from beets; peel beets. Cut beets into 1-inch pieces and place in a 13×9-inch baking pan. Toss with the olive oil; spread in pan. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover the pan with foil and roast for 20 minutes. Remove foil and roast for 10 to 15 minutes more or until beets are tender. Set aside to cool slightly.

2. In a serving bowl, whisk together garlic, salt and pepper, mustard, vinegar, and oil. Add warm beets and, if desired, sliced purple onion; toss to coat. Allow to cool to room temperature (about 20 minutes). Add baby greens; toss again. Sprinkle with blue cheese and, if you like, snipped fresh chives to serve.

3. French Chèvre Salad with Peaches, Pine Nuts, and Arugula 

Goat cheese, peaches, and arugula star in this easy French Chevre salad. Photo courtesy of Goat Cheeses of France.

Goat cheese, peaches, and arugula star in this easy French Chevre salad. Photo courtesy of Goat Cheeses of France.

It’s peach (and nectarine!) season–and both can be used in this lovely salad. Just be sure to find the freshest-best arugula you can find.

The recipe and photo are courtesy of the Goat Cheeses of France. It stars a bloomy-rind style of goat cheese, sometimes referred to as Goat Cheese Camembert or Goat Cheese Brie. You can also use French goat brique, goat chabichou or another aged goat cheese.

Serves 4.

1  1/2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2  1/2  tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
5 ounces arugula
2 peaches, peeled and sliced or 2 nectarines, sliced
2 tablespoons pine nuts
1 tablespoon thinly sliced red onion
3 1/2 ounces French goat camembert or brie

In a large bowl, add vinegar, olive oil, salt and pepper, whisking to combine. Add arugula, tossing to coat greens with dressing. Taste, and adjust seasonings as needed. Add peaches, pine nuts, and onion, tossing again to combine. Divide onto 4 plates. Divide the cheese into four quarters. Slice each quarter of cheese, and place on top of each salad serving.

4. Swiss Chard Salad with Pistachios, Apples, and Roquefort

An unexpected delight for a French lunch. Photo by Richard Swearinger

Swiss Chard Salad: An unexpected delight for a French lunch. Photo by Richard Swearinger

Chard is totally in season right now at the farmers market. Take advantage.

FAQ: What does Swiss Chard taste like? Will I like it?

Answer: Do you like beets? Do you like spinach? If so, you’ll love Swiss Chard–the stems taste beet-like, while the leaves taste spinach-like, but with a depth of flavor all its own. Try it in this recipe, with some of those local apples that are just now making their way into the market.

FAQ: What do the French call Swiss Chard?

Answer: They call these lovely leaves blettes.

Here’s the link to the recipe for French Swiss Chard Salad.

One of France’s favorite ways with Swiss Chard is in a Tourte de Blettes (Swiss Chard Pie). See my recipe for Tourte de Blettes on my friend Richard Nahem’s site, EyePreferParis.com.

5. French Tomato and Green Bean Salad

Yes! This is even better with cute little haricot-verts. But you also can't go wrong with some great locally grown green beans.

Yes! This is even better with cute little haricot-verts. But you also can’t go wrong with some great locally grown green beans.

I recently posted five easy French recipes for tomatoes, and judging from the number of times that this easy French salad recipe was  pinned, I think this was the winner!

6. French Green Bean Salad Recipe with Caprese

French Green Bean Salad Recipe with Caprese (or, if you flavor it with French herbs, call it Caprice!)

French Green Bean Salad Recipe with Caprese (or, if you flavor it with French herbs, call it Caprice!)

At first glance, this is similar to #5, but while #5 is perfect side to a grilled or roasted meat, the Caprese could make salad No. 6 into a main dish. Simply add some bread and maybe cured meats, and call it dinner.

For four servings:

1 pound green beans, trimmed
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic
1/4 cup chopped green onions
Caprese/Caprice
Salt and pepper to taste

Cook the green beans in boiling salted water for 5 to 10 minutes or until barely tender. Drain well, then sauté the beans in 2 tablespoons olive oil with the garlic and green onions until crisp tender. Serve with Caprese salad, and season all to taste.

Note: You probably don’t need a recipe for Caprese salad, but allow me to remind you that it’s all about the best ingredients you can find. Layer heirloom tomatoes withfresh mozzarella. Drizzle with a great olive oil. Sprinkle with fresh herbs (basil is traditional, though I also enjoy any fines herbes (tarragon, parsley, chives) on this as well).

Enjoy the late-summer bounty!

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