How to Pan-Roast Garlic by the Extraordinary R.F. Swearinger

Pan-Roasted Garlic: Or, How to Roast Garlic When You Only Need a Clove or Two.

Pan-Roasted Garlic: Or, How to Roast Garlic When You Only Need a Clove or Two. Photo by the extraordinary Richard Swearinger.

In this post, my friend and co-author Richard Swearinger, who has worked as a food editor for 20-plus years, shows us the method for roasting garlic on the stove-top, rather than in the oven. It’s a great method when you don’t have a lot of time–or don’t need an entire bulb of garlic.

A word about Richard: He’s a great photographer and a killer food editor. When it comes to developing recipes, he has one of the best palates I’ve ever come across. I’ve loved working with him, and I’m encouraging him to write his own blog. He’s always coming up with better, faster, and infinitely more tasty ways to do things—he could be a one-man America’s Test Kitchen.

Here’s his method for pan-roasting garlic:

“When you need just a few cloves of roasted garlic, the best method is on top of your stove. It has the same caramelly oven-roasted garlic flavor, but it’s a bit quicker. Here’s how to pan-roast garlic:
Preheat a pan over medium heat (if your stove runs hot, set it on medium low). Separate the required number of cloves from the bulb. Place the unpeeled cloves your preheated pan, add a glug of olive oil, and cook for about 10 minutes, turning so both sides of the garlic gets cooked. Once the  start to get toasty, take the pan off the fire, cover, and let the clovers finish cooking in the leftover heat till they’re soft enough to be easily pierced with a fork. To use, remove from pan, allow to cool and remove the skins.”

Richard adds:

“I hadn’t used this method for a while but pulled it out when making the amazing Italian Wedding Farro Salad from Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don’t Have to Be Vegan to Love by Terry Hope Romero. Her book is a treasure trove, every recipe I’ve tried is a gem; it’s recommended for carnivores and vegetarians alike.”

 

PPS: Here’s a photo of Richard and me in 2012, the first time we got together at a coffee shop to talk about our e-book projects. He think he looks goofy. I think he looks like Richard—a cool and sophisticated dude with a great sense of humor.

 

Richard Swearinger and me, launching our ebooks career at a local coffeehouse in 2012.

Richard Swearinger and me, launching our ebooks career at a local coffeehouse in 2012.

PPS: Here’s an Amazon Affiliate link to the book Richard is talking about, above. Richard told me that he and his wife, Maria Duryee, have been cooking out of it almost exclusively for a few weeks. That’s a high praise.

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1 comment to How to Pan-Roast Garlic, by the Extraordinary R.F. Swearinger

  • Thanks for this tip/technique. I only cook in small batches anymore and it is nice to have what I call a “culinary toolkit”. I would love if you would blog about palate. I have a friend that I call a super-taster. She can detect the slightest sweetness in any dish be it sweet or savory. I am funny about my olive oil and she cannot detect what I am talking about.

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