Great Giveaway Alert:

Now in Paperback! And I'm giving a copy away.

Now in Paperback! And I’m giving a copy away.

UDATE! THE PAPERBACK EDITION OF THIS BOOK IS PUBLISHED TODAY.

THE WINNER OF THIS GIVEAWAY IS MARY KAY HARLAN. MKH: I WILL BE CONTACTING YOU SHORTLY.

If you didn’t win, consider purchasing this book all the same–it’s truly a wonderful read for anyone who loves France and food.

Original post:

Have you read Ann Mah’s Mastering the Art of French Eating?If not, then it’s high time!: The book is soon to be released in paperback. Better yet–you could win this book. I will be giving away a hot-off-the-press paperback copy of the book on Tuesday, October 28, which is the official release date of the paperback edition. 

To enter the giveaway, all you need do is “like” this post (see that little “like” button up there on the left? Just click on it!). Then, post a comment below, telling me:

1. That you’ve “liked” this post (otherwise, I won’t know!).
2. Which recipe you’d like to make from the book (see below).

On October 28, I will randomly choose a winner from among the comments.

In case you’re not familiar with this book, here are a few excerpts from my review that originally appeared on the BonjourParis.com website:

Author Ann Mah and her husband, Calvin, get oh-so close to living the dream: His career as a diplomat lands them a 3-year stint in Paris. Hardly have they unpacked, however, when the couple get the call: Calvin is assigned a one-year post in Iraq; spouses are not to follow. With few friends and not a whole lot to do, Mah, a novelist and food and travel writer, finds herself alone in the city she had dreamed of savoring à deux.

Soon, the weight of solitude bears down on Mah. To combat her sadness, Mah gives herself an assignment: She’ll crisscross France, seeking out the stories behind the country’s most famous regional dishes, from choucroute in the northeast to cassoulet in the Southwest; from crêpes in Brittany to soup au pistou in Provence.

Ann Mah, author of Mastering the Art of French Eating

Ann Mah, author of Mastering the Art of French Eating

We travel alongside Mah as she meets chefs, farmers, and restaurateurs, picking up history, insights, and cooking tips along the way. She uncovers nuggets that even veteran American Francophiles may not know (such as, for example, that the Aveyronnais are responsible for the proliferation of the Parisian cafés).  

You’ll love the fresh, vivid ways in which she describes touchstones of our Francophilia. When a waiter in Burgundy rattles off the region’s famed wines that are served by the glass, “It felt like a celebrity sighting.” Brittany’s cooks recite crêpe recipes from memory, “like a favorite poem or prayer,” while their buckwheat crêpes resemble “dark, shining lace…against clean white porcelain.” Again and again Mah reminds us why we love France, from “surprise glimpses of Notre Dame caught from the bus,” to “the small cups of coffee garnished with a paper-wrapped sugar cube” at the café.

Each chapter revolves around a signature dish from a specific region. Mah tells history and lore about the recipe, as well as her own story of how she cajoled the recipe from those who held its secrets. And of course, she gives the recipes themselves:

• Steak Frites from Paris
• Andouillette from Troyes
• Crêpes from Brittany
• Salade Lyonnaise from Lyon
• Soup au Pistou from Provence
• Cassoulet from Toulouse, Castelnaudary, Carcassonne
• Choucroute Garnie from Alsace
• Fondue from Savoie and the Haut-Savoie
• Boeuf Bourguignon from you-know-where
• Aligot from the Aveyron

Which recipe intrigues you most? Post below to enter in my drawing. And thanks!

Disclosure: I received a free copy of this book from the publisher; however, I was not obligated to cover it in any way.

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